19th century Amlwch public houses and landlords
Prior to 1830 many unlicensed "Beer Houses" were to be found in Amlwch. The 1830 Beer act required premises to be licensed. However unlicenced "retailers of beer" are recorded in Amlwch for many years afterwards
Pub name Location 1828 1835 1841 1844 1850 1861 1868 1874 1881 1883 1885 1886 1891 1895 Notes (2002)
Adelphi Vaults Wharf Street           Owen Parry   Owen Parry Owen Parry Margaret Hughes Margaret Hughes Margaret Hughes   Margaret Hughes The permanent office of the Amlwch Mutual Marine insurnace company. The name of The Vaults on a pub sign has long been used to inform passers-by that the building was used to store liquors and wines. As this pub is close to the harbour this may well have been the case.
Amlwch harbour Chapel street           Elinor Hughes Dryhurst Hughes                
Bellas inn Port Road now Machine street                 William Hughes           Near labour exchange, Tie up fees of 6d per ship tieing up to posts on the Bodednyfed esate around the harbour are recorded in 1750s
Belmont Vaults Machine street               Richard Lemin   Jane Evans Elizabeth Evans Elizabeth Evans   Elizabeth Evans 1890 OS just west of Mona foundary
Blacksmith's arms Penrhyd                             House on RHS going up Peh rhyd hill
Blue bell 19 Quay street Amelia Parry John Jones John Jones John Jones John Jones John Jones John Jones John Jones Daniel McLean Daniel McLean Daniel McLean (still here in 1891 census and also as collector of port dues) Daniel McLean   John Owens At one period this pub was the meeting place of ships Captains before they set sail with the grain harvest All the ships would lead on the same tide and the first Captain to tie up in Llancaster would receive a silk lined hat. The pub is mentioned in the church register in 1813. In later years it became a lodging place for tramps.
Boldon Wharf Street     William Hannel     Catherine Hughes                  
Britannia Bridge Port Road     Hugh Hughes Hugh Hughes Hugh Hughes Hugh Hughes Rowland Owen Ellen Owen Rowland Owen Ellen Owens Ellen Owens Ellen Owens     Applied for license in 1826
Bryn Ddeiol Market Place John Jones         John Jones     John Jones           Now stanley house,close to church yard
Buck Methusalam Street Jane Pritchard Jane Pritchard John Roose John Roose                      
Bull Market street           Anne Williams   Hugh Lewis Hugh Lewis Hugh Lewis Hugh Lewis Hugh Lewis   Hugh Lewis Stilll a pub.Applied for license in 1813. The pub name "Bull" was often a reference to Richard Duke of York.
Bull Hotel Bull bay               William Williams   Rebecca Pearson Rebecca Pearson Rebecca Pearson   S A Williams  
Bull's head Petters street   Richard Parry Richard Parry Richard Parry Richard Parry Richard Parry Ellen Thomas Ellen Thomas Ellen Thomas Richard Pritchard         East portion of Manchester House
Bull's Head 12 Market place     Owen Jones Owen Jones       Henry Jones         Elizabeth Lewis   The Bull's Head and it's older relative, The Bull, are both ancient and widespread signs. It is thought that the bull name is originally derived from a reference to a papal bull - the leaden seal attached to the pope's edicts (the Latin name being bulla). A bull's head was introduced into the arms of Henry VIII after he had defied the papal bull of 1538 which at least gives an approximate date for the origin's of the pub name itself although it has remained a popular pub sign over the course of time.
California Inn Wesley Street                 John Williams            
Castle Hotel Petters street late 20 Mona Street     John Hughes John Hughes John Hughes William Roberts   John Hughes William Roberts John Hughes John Hughes John Hughes John Hughes Lucy Ann Norris Down from Dinorben Hotel. In 1821 a meeting to form a National school in Amlwch was held here. The Masonic lodge also meet here before their new HQ opened in 1897. The hotel had stables for 25 horse. In 1823 the first public transport started from this pub. The Ferry Coach "Marquis of Anglesey" left at 04:15 every morning to catch the ferry at Menai Bridge. In 1869 Mr Owen robrts was adveriting a coach service to the packet departing at 6 am to catch the 10 am sailing from Menai Bridge to Liverpool.
Clock Petters Street   Ann Jones William Williams       Lewis Williams Mary Williams Mary Williams Mary Williams Mary Williams     Mary Williams  
Coach & Horse Kings Street Owen Hughes John Williams       Richard Jones Richard Jones               This sign signifies that it was a posting- house, a stage-coach house, or both.
Cross Keys School lane                         Edward Mitchel   The Cross Keys is a very common sign around Great Britain and is related to Christian heraldry. The cross keys refer to St.Peter, to whom Jesus said: "I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven." It is not surprising therefore to find that the papal arms features the crossed keys. In addition, they often appear in the arms of various bishops. The sign of the Cross Keys appears on signs close to churches and can indicate that the building was closely associated with it. It was a thatched roof building built on church land opposite the billiard club. Still licenced to a Mr Gussey in 1828.
Crown & Anchor Parys Street Edward Owen Edward Owen Owen Owens Owen Owens   Sidney Williams Sidney Williams H Thomas             Recorded in church records 1808
Dinorben Hotel ( Ty Mawr) Market Place Owen Jones Owen Owens Owen Jones   Robert Samual Ellen Roberts Ellen Roberts Ellen Roberts   Anne Roberts Anne Roberts Anne Roberts Anne Roberts Anne Roberts Originally know as "Ty mawr" This hotel has been at the center of social life in Amlwch since at least 1784. It was used as a court house in that year with a young man called William Roberts being stripped to the waist, tied to horse back and whiped to the port and back for stealing. The hirng fair for farmers was held here each March and October. The original beer hose was in the area of the present kithen. Beer was served in pewter mug onto a wooden table with a copper edge. Holes around the edge allowed the spilt beer to run off onto the reed bedded floor. Excess ran out of the beer house to the pigs in the street.
Druid Market Place John Griffiths John Griffiths Edward Owens Edward Owens     William Hughes   John Jones John Jones         Located behind the Eleth. Demolished 19/11/1962
Duke of Wellington Market square   Cullen Bawden             Mary Williams Mary Williams J Williams J Williams      
Eagles Quay street   William Jones Jane Jones Robert Jones Mary Jones Mary Jones George Griffiths George Griffiths George Griffiths Sarah Hughes Sarah Hughes Sarah Hughes     Paid 31/6 rates in 1800. It was here that the Litery and Scientific Society meet in 1830 before they opened there own building. The sign of The Eagle first appeared in the fifteenth century and is thought to be related to the use of the bird in both Christian and heraldic symbolism. Eagles were widely used to decorate church lecterns as it was the symbol of St.John the Baptist. However, many eagles used in pub signs are black in colour. This colour was prevalent on sign boards following the Gin Act of 1736 which was seen as a threat to the traditional inn. Owners of pubs would often drape black velvet on their signs or, in many cases, added the prefix 'black' to the pub's name.
Eleth Market square                   Richard Lemin Jane Lemin Richard Lemin Jane Lemin Jane Lemin The "Mens Welfare Club" meet here. Members paid 1/2 per month and received 12/6 per week if ill. Also a burial grant of 10. Each month 12 stewards would be elected to visit the sick and attend funerals in the official club regalia. The club went into voluntary liquidation when NHS was founded. the hotel was also the home of the Royal Miners Friendly Society which had 270 members in 1869 and paid out 155 in benifits. The hotel stood at the North end of Dinorben square and was demolised for road widening in 1962.
Farmers Arms 12 Mona Street Francis Madden Francis Madden William Evans William Evans William Evans William Evans     William Morton William Morton William Morton William Morton Agnes Churney    
Freemasons Arms Methusalem street John Hughes John Hughes Name changed to Castle Hotel                       Later called Castle Hotel
Gardeners arms Tredaeth               Daniel Roberts Daniel Roberts Eliza Roberts Eliza Roberts Eliza Roberts   Robert Roberts  
George & dragon Parys Street William Jones William Jones William Jones William Jones William Jones   Thomas Williams Thomas Williams Thomas Williams           Next door to Bull inn
George IV 4 Llanelian Road           Hannah Wrench   Ellen Parry Samual Wrench Ellen Parry Ellen Parry Ellen Parry Ellen Parry Ellen Parry  
Grenville Hotel                               Bult by a draper called Robert williams,
Harp Chapel street John Pritchard John Pritchard       Margaret Fisher                  
Hope and anchor Lower quay street     Ann Roose     Sarah Mathews John Williams Evan Williams John Williams           From the words of St.Paul (Hebrews 6:19): "We have this as a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope...." Often used when an old sailor took over a pub.
Holly Bush                               The name of the Holly Bush iand goes back to the very early days of inns and taverns in Britain. This is because the Romans used the holly bush during their Saturnalia celebrations which often extended to seven days of unrestrained revelry that usually ended up with debauchery. On town fair days any house could put a sprig of holly over the door and serve hopme made brew without the need for a license.
Jolly Sailor   Hugh Jones Name changed to Castle Hotel                         Applied for license in 1809.Later called Castle Hotel
Kings arms King Street John Jones John Jones                          
Kings Head Salem Steet Thomas Jones Thomas Jones         Owen Thomas Hugh Owen Owen Thomas Hugh Owen Hugh Owen Hugh Owen   Hugh Owen  
Lemin Vaults Port Road                 Capt Lemin            
Liverpool arms 64 machine street   Samual Judd     Owen Jones Owen Jones Owen Jones Owen Jones Owen Jones Owen Jones Owen Jones Owen Jones Owen Jones Owen Jones  
Llwydiarth Arms Amlwch port               O Jones              
Marquis of Anglesey Kings street   Richard Evans Richard Evans Richard Evans Richard Evans Richard Evans Richard Evans Richard Evans Richard Evans Richard Evans       Hugh Parry Applied for license in 1824.
Marquis of Anglesey Rhosybol         Owen Jones Jane Jones Jane Jones O Goronwy O Goronwy O Goronwy       Mary Owen  
Menai Bridge Wharf Steet     Mary Roberts     Jane Roberts   Jane Jones Capt O Jones Jane Jones          
Miner's Arms Pensarn               O Williams O Williams O Williams          
Mona Tavern Chapel Street     Elizabeth Hughes Elizabeth Hughes Elizabeth Hughes Elizabeth Hughes Elizabeth Hughes John Hughes Elizabeth Hughes            
New haven Turkey shore     Ellen Hughes     Catherine Williams Sarah Hughes Sarah Hughes Sarah Hughes Ellen Price Hugh Hughes Hugh Hughes Hugh Hughes   Recorded in Church records Hugh Evans 1786. One of the earliest pubs for smelters.Many New Inns sprang up in the 16th century as a result of Queen Elizabeth I who, on her many travels around England, complained about the lack of suitable places to stay. The pub is close to a site of a suspected Elizabethan Quay and so may have received it's name in the same way
New Mill Market place Jane Jones Jane Jones                          
Oddfellows arms Market place         Owen Owens Owen Owens Jane Owens Jane Owens Jane Owens           The origin of this sign can be traced back to the Independent Order of Oddfellows (Manchester Union), a social and benevolent society with branches throughout the world. Many such groups were formed partly for social reasons but primarily to provide members and their families with financial support in case of sickness or on death. The Oddfellows is one of the oldest and was founded at some time before 1745. Its name is said to be derived from a remark made about its founder members.
Old England Wharf Street           James James James James   James Hughes            
Old post Methusalem street             William Morton                
Packet house 15 Turkey shore           Jane Petters Nicholas Petters Nicholas Petters Nicholas Petters Ellen Rowlands Ellen Peters Ellen Peters Hugh Evans    
Pen y bonc Queens street                             Regent house,Own cock fighting pit
Pilot boat Lligwy             Margaret Jones Ebenezer Griffiths              
Pilot Boat Bull Bay               Owen Jones   Griffith Edwards          
Plough King Street Richard Evans Richard Evans                          
Plume of Feathers   John Williams                           Applied for license in 1826. Mentioned in church records for 1814. Pub name referes to Prince of Wales.
Prince of Wales Salem Street             Dryhurst Jones Dryhurst Jones Dryhurst Jones            
Queens Head Salem street (9 Queen street)                   Owen Jones Gwen Jones Gwen Jones Gwen Jones Gwen Jones Had a public weighing machine for horse drawn vehicles. Many urban pubs and beerhouses first opened during Queen Victoria's reign so this would explain the sign's popularity
Victoria tavern Chapel Street           Margaret Thomas                 1861 census
Raglan castle Market place             Margaret Thomas J Hughes Mary Thomas J Parry          
Railway 14 Salem Street             William Jones Jane Jones William Jones Jane Jones John Williams John Thomas Williams   John Williams Had facilities for weighing pigs which were raised by many people to be sold as cash to pay the rent. The name changed to Jolly Sailor and then Mariners in 1965.
Red Bull Pig market         John Williams                    
Red Lion Pig market Margaret Williams Anne Jones     William Madren Owen Parry John Roberts John Roberts John Roberts           Now Midland bank. Applied for Licence in 1810. In Scotland, the Red Lion is a heraldic reference because when James I (also James VI of Scotland) came to the throne he ordered that a heraldic red lion should be displayed in public places.
Rifleman's arms Wesly Steet             William Williams William Williams William Williams William Williams William Williams William Williams     Opposite "The buffs"
Royal Oak Quay Street   Samual Jones         Catherine Evans J Jones Catherine Evans J Jones Grace Jones Grace Jones   Grace Jones Private house at entrance to Quay.
Sailor's home Queen street           Ellen Parry Owen Parry William Owen              
Ship Amlwch port John Hughes Ellen Hughes Elizabeth Hughes Elizabeth Hughes Elizabeth Hughes William Williams Samual Wrench Joseph Hughes   Rowland Davies         Applied for licence in 1826
Ship & Castle Quay Street           Thomas Pritchard William McKaigg Humphrey Robinson William McKaigg Ann Robinson          
Ship Launch Wharf Street                 Ellin Jones           Facing Royal oak
Ships tavern Methusalem street         Dryhurts Hughes     Owen Hughes Owen Hughes           West portion of "Emporium"
Skerries Chapel street           Owen Owen Owen Owen Owen Owen Owen Owen Owen Owen          
Stag Petters street later 18 Mona Street             John Roberts Anne Roose Fanny Roose Anne Roose Anne Roose Anne Roose Anne Roose Margaret Roose Now Grenville Hotel
Stars High Steet,Port             Richard Hughes Richard Hughes Richard Hughes           Applied for license in 1826
Sun Quay street Mary Thomas Hugh Hughes       Catherine Griffiths Laura Wrench William Roberts Laura Wrench Richard Owen         On rock above harbour,Applied for licence in 1825
Swan Brickfield Street           Catherine Griffiths William Mudge William Owen William Mudge William Owen         The sign of The Swan first appeared in the 14th century and is thought to originate from either a direct allusion to the swan itself or a coat of arms featuring the bird. Indeed, in this latter guise, it was favoured by Henry VIII and Edward III. In early times the swan was a symbol of innocence and this is perhaps the reason why The White Swan is such a common variant
Two Frigates Methusalem street           Owen Hughes Owen Hughes                
Uxbridge Arms Rhosybol           Henry Rowlands Henry Rowlands Ann Rowlands   William Owen         Now Marquis of Anglesey
Union Market place Owen Roberts Elizabeth Roberts                          
Watermans arms Wharf Street           Mary Williams Richard Griffiths Richard Griffiths Richard Griffiths Owen Owen Owen Owen Owen Owen   Owen Owen John Jones "Coch Bach" from Bala stole 10 in 1900 and was sentenced to Goal at Beumaris.
Wheatsheaf School lane             Jane Jones Jane Jones John Jones Hugh Jones Hugh Jones Hugh Jones Hugh Jones Hugh Jones Demolished 13/11/1962 Bull bay road widening. The sign of The Wheatsheaf has been popular since the 17th century. Indeed, a sheaf of wheat appears in several coats-of-arms, including those of the Worshipful Company of Bakers (1486). Moreover, it appears in the arms of the Brewers' Company.
White lion Market square   Roger Mostyn Owen Jones                       Now Halifax office. Name refers to Edward IV
Windmill School lane / 1 market street         Jane Jones Jane Jones Jane Jones Mary Jones Jane Jones Robert Jones Richard Evans Richard Edwards Richard Edwards John Hughes Demolished 13/11/1962 Bull bay road widening
Wine Lodge Methusalem Street                 William Hobday           Now Glyndwr house
Winllan Petters street                 Lewis williams